How-To

rushy lope, too fast in canter, raises head in canter, head up in canter, horse falls apart, jim greendyk

Q - In the lope my horse raises his head and rushes, but he’s fine in walk and trot. How can I encourage him to relax, lower his head and neck, and slow down? A - It is very common for things to “fall apart” as a horse picks up speed. There are numerous reasons for this and often it’s a combination of several factors.

building trust with your horse, horse trust, equine trust, anne gage

Many horses have some level of separation anxiety. If the anxiety is mild, it may only be annoying or a minor inconvenience. But, if your horse is so herd-bound that her behaviour makes you feel anxious, it may be endangering your and your horse’s safety.

horse ulcers, juliet getty, equine ulcers, free choice forage feeding, horse digestion, beet pulp, hindgut microbial population, vitamin b horse

I never stop urging horse owners to “feed your horse like a horse,” for the simple reason that a horse, fed according to his physiology and instincts, will be healthier. Free choice forage feeding is the first line of defense against ulcers, but there is more an owner can do to protect his horse from the pain and stress of this condition.

jane savoie, half halt, riding dressage, dressage half halt, robert dover

The secret to riding your dressage horse like a professional is to ride from half halt to half halt rather than from movement to movement. The half halt is your connective tissue between the dressage movements. They’re what make your ride or dressage test look like it flows seamlessly like a dance.

organize horse tack room, horse tack, equine tack, organize equine tack room, horse tack

You’ve finally arrived at the barn after a busy day at work, looking forward to clearing your mind and enjoying some quality horse time, when you open the door of your tack room…. There’s your saddle pad, still damp from yesterday’s ride, in a lump on the floor. Now you’ve located one glove but the other is nowhere to be found.

riding with confidence, rider confidence, anne gage, confident horsemanship, psychology of riding

Losing “your nerve” after falling off your horse is quite common - even if you haven’t been hurt. Your mind is a powerful tool that can work for you or against you. Much of what goes on in our minds happens unconsciously. Here are seven quick techniques to help get you back on track:

mud fever in horses, muddy horse feet, horse with mud fever, treating mud fever in a horse, pam mackenzie, lindsay grice

Q - What is the best treatment plan for mud fever, and can I prevent it from recurring annually in certain horses? A - Mud fever, also known as scratches, pastern dermatitis, and greasy heel, is a common equine skin disease affecting the lower limbs, particularly the back of the pasterns and the bulbs of the heels.

Pages

Advertisement

Intercity Insurance and CapriCMW Insurance

Advertisement

Tribute Equine Nutrition