Fitness

Riding without stirrups, rider position, horse riding, two point trot, two point walk

When riders take the time to build a good foundation with a correct position and basic training skills, they will reach their training and riding goals faster than if they skip these steps in the beginning of their riding careers. A “correct” position is determined by the style or discipline of riding you participate in. I am going to give you some of my favorite rider strengthening exercises for developing a stronger hunter seat equitation position.

3 Point Touch Rider, Horse Fitness, Rider Fitness, Gina Belasik, riding fit, equifit services

Have you ever witnessed the beauty of a wonderful freestyle, a reining pattern, or perhaps a show like Cavalia in which the rider and horse seem to be working together in such harmony that you can hardly tell where the rider ends and horse begins? For rider and horse to be “one” with each other is the desired state we strive for. What we seek is to seamlessly flow together in a beautiful stream of energy travelling together through space. If your desire is to achieve such a state, and to ride to the best of your ability, then please read on!

BioRider Fitness believes that horseback riders are athletes, and should train like athletes. Regardless of whether the objective is jumping fences or mastering a dressage test, riders who incorporate cross-training working into their lifestyle achieve more success in the saddle.

Three Pre-Ride Stretches for Equestrians

By Heather Sansom - By warming up and correcting posture before you get in the saddle, you are much more likely to be able to achieve the ear-shoulder-hip-heel alignment you are looking for and prepare your joints to better absorb the motion of your horse. Here are three stretches I recommend as pre-ride stretches to help a rider work out any tightness from sitting or driving during the day, or from a previous ride.

By Heather Sansom - The primary goal of a rider fitness program is to build stamina and strength appropriate to the discipline. All riders should have a strong core, good balance, good general flexibility, and a fairly high level of proprioception (awareness of where your body parts are in relation to your body and movement).

Master the Sitting Trot

By Sandra Verda-Zanatta - Ah, sitting trot – the nemesis of so many riders of all ages, levels, and disciplines! In order to develop a balanced, independent seat that does not hinder the horse, but rather allows him to move with maximum ease and efficiency, the rider needs to have flexibility and suppleness through the legs, hips, and lumbar spine (lower back), stability in the pelvis, and strength in the core. These qualities allow the rider to maintain an upright posture that is firm and supple, not rigid, as riding is dynamic and requires a constant repetitive series of muscle contractions.

Olympic Gold Medal Eventer Phillip Dutton shares his thoughts about rider fitness in this video from Kentucky Equine Research.

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