Taxonomy term

hores body condition scores horse, Reconditioning Horse, spring horse riding, get a horse fit, horse feed change, equine fitness, horse exercise, overworked horse

As we welcome the transition from winter to spring, we are eager to get back in the saddle and start riding regularly again. Canadian winters are not sympathetic to outdoor riding, and without access to indoor facilities many horse owners have not been able to ride or exercise their horses as much as they would like during the winter months. Bringing horses back into work after their winter vacation must be done gradually by starting at a lower level and increasing the duration and intensity of workouts. At the same time, the horse’s feed should be adjusted to address his present body condition (too thin or too fat) as well as nutrient requirements for the increased workload.

mud fever horses, equine mud fever, supplements for equine mud fever, vetcur, stone hedge farms, Cur1, DiVet, ImVet

This time of year it is a constant battle with the mud and our horses are at risk of getting mud fever. Mud fever is not a single disease but can come in different forms. The condition occurs especially in warm, wet weather, and is certainly not limited to horses that are paddling in knee-deep mud. Mud fever starts off with dry crusts, which are caused by the inflamed skin weeping. The condition can range from a mild skin irritation to very painful infected sores, and can in some cases cause significant swelling with severe lameness.

mud fever in horses, muddy horse feet, horse with mud fever, treating mud fever in a horse, pam mackenzie, lindsay grice

Q - What is the best treatment plan for mud fever, and can I prevent it from recurring annually in certain horses? A - Mud fever, also known as scratches, pastern dermatitis, and greasy heel, is a common equine skin disease affecting the lower limbs, particularly the back of the pasterns and the bulbs of the heels.

Horse Jumping

As we move through the height of our summer competition season, it is not uncommon to have multiple days of severe heat and humidity - the days when you sweat while standing still.

Flax Seed

Seasonal Pruritus (commonly known as Sweet Itch) is the most common allergic skin condition in horses.

Horse on Cross Country

The last ten to fifteen minutes of every ride should consist of walking on a long or loose rein to allow the horse to relax, stretch his muscles, and, if he is winded from the exercise, catch his breath. This may be all the cool-down the average horse requires in order to physically recover from moderate exercise on a cool to warmish day. But intense workouts can strain muscles, ligaments, and tendons, and when coupled with soaring summer temperatures can cause your horse’s body temperature to skyrocket. An appropriate cool-down in these cases addresses the recovery of the horse’s muscles and other soft tissue structures that have just been in use, as well as bringing his heart rate, breathing rate, and body temperature safely down to their normal statistics.

Horse Pasture

By Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. - If you let your horse out to graze on pasture for only a few hours each day, and provide hay the rest of the time, you've likely noticed how he approaches the grass like a vacuum cleaner, barely lifting his head the entire time he is outside.

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