How-To

How to Care for Your New Foal

By Mark Andrews, DVM - You have waited eleven months for your foal to arrive. Now he is here what can you do to ensure he gets off to the best possible start in life? First thing's first. Make sure that the foal sucks. A normal foal should stand and drink from the mare within two hours. If the foal is having difficulty sucking, or is not interested, he may have serious problems. Call an experienced horse vet sooner rather than later.

Spring Horse Care

By Kentucky Equine Research - Do you ride all winter, no matter how deep the snow gets, or do you hang up your saddle at the first cool breeze in autumn? If the winter season has caused any modifications in your horse’s exercise level or feeding plan, you will need to consider the following points as you bring the horse back into work in the spring.

horse rushing the jumps

By Georgia Hunt - It's easy to get excited or nervous about jumping and turn your energy level up a notch without even being aware of it. To counter act this, give yourself a list of jobs to focus on.

Pepping Up the Lazy Horse

By Lindsay Grice - Riding should not be an aerobic workout like riding an exercise bike. Self-carriage is when a horse maintains his pace, straightness, and frame or outline when you lighten up on your aids. You’re not really riding until you take the training wheels off!

Colostrum for Foals: The Magic Milk

Winter snow may still blanket the ground, but foaling season will be here before we know it. If you have a pregnant mare in your barn, plan ahead to collect and freeze some of her colostrum — that all-important first milk — so you have it on hand if a foal is born without access to this essential liquid.

How to Prepare for Piaffe and Passage, Bonny Bonnello, dressage training pyramid apex, equine collection, equine lateral work, horse half-halt to decreased stride

With Bonny Bonnello - The apex of the dressage training pyramid, collection is of the utmost importance for a dressage horse when it comes to performing expressive flying changes, half-passes, piaffe, and passage. Collection can be described as the shortening of your horse’s frame – not just his neck, but his complete longitudinal frame – and transferring more weight onto the hindquarters. But this shortening should not affect the forward rhythm.

Dont' Let Rain Ruin Your Good Leather Tack

By Anna Carner Blangiforti - If you ride far enough and often enough, the day will inevitably come when you're caught out in a drencher. When you get back to shelter, you'll scrape your horse and towel him down, then find yourself some dry clothes and something warm to drink. If you're smart, you'll also tend to your tack before the mud dries on and the leather dries out. Timely tack care can also prevent the blooming of mold and mildew problems which, once established, can become a major nuisance.

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