How-To

How to Prepare for Piaffe and Passage, Bonny Bonnello, dressage training pyramid apex, equine collection, equine lateral work, horse half-halt to decreased stride

With Bonny Bonnello - The apex of the dressage training pyramid, collection is of the utmost importance for a dressage horse when it comes to performing expressive flying changes, half-passes, piaffe, and passage. Collection can be described as the shortening of your horse’s frame – not just his neck, but his complete longitudinal frame – and transferring more weight onto the hindquarters. But this shortening should not affect the forward rhythm.

Dont' Let Rain Ruin Your Good Leather Tack

By Anna Carner Blangiforti - If you ride far enough and often enough, the day will inevitably come when you're caught out in a drencher. When you get back to shelter, you'll scrape your horse and towel him down, then find yourself some dry clothes and something warm to drink. If you're smart, you'll also tend to your tack before the mud dries on and the leather dries out. Timely tack care can also prevent the blooming of mold and mildew problems which, once established, can become a major nuisance.

Waterproofing Horse Blankets

With Susan Barron - No blanket stays waterproof forever. After it's been well used for a few years, the waterproofing will wear off. You'll know it's time to re-waterproof when you notice wetness along the midline of the horse's back and croup.

Equine Guelph, equine manure, horse manure, horse deworm, horse parasite, horse worm, equine worm, equine parasite, fecal egg count, horse fecal, equine fecal, Canadian Horse Journal, horse Canada, horse sport, horsemanship, Western horse, English horse

By Jackie Bellamy - When a growing resistance to dewormers is cited as a major issue concerning horse owners today, a fecal exam to see if your parasite control program is working makes sense. Collecting a manure sample is easy, but it must be done properly to ensure accurate test results.

Checking Your Horse's Vital Signs

By Jess Hallas-Kilcoyne - Every horse owner should be familiar with his or her horse’s “normal” vital signs. Knowing your horse’s healthy, resting temperature, heart rate, respiration rate, capillary refill time, and gut sounds will help you realize when he is unwell. Additionally, in the event of illness or injury to your horse, being able to check and report his vital signs can help indicate to your veterinarian the horse’s present condition.

Dealing with Tension in Horses

By Will Clinging - Tension in horses can lead to all kinds of problems and hinder their ability to learn. Some horses are so tense and stiff that they are incapable of certain maneuvers. This can lead to frustration and anxiety, which in turn leads to increased tension.

Jonathan Field, natural horsemanship, Leg Shy Horse, claustrophobic horse, connect with shy horse, rope leading horse, get horse to direct steer, horse leading by his feet, horses working cows

By Jonathan Field - Helping a horse that is fearful and claustrophobic around his legs to become confident and respectful for grooming, veterinary, and farrier work is a delicate process. If done wrong, the result can be a more fearful horse. Horses are flight animals and their legs provide the means for their primary survival tactic. You can’t blame your horse for doing what he feels he needs to do for self-preservation. Yet when they trust us, it’s amazing how many things horses will accept that go against their instincts.

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Riding Vactions in California with Jec Ballou