Illness & Injury

veterinary simulator industries calgary alberta, equine reproductive system, equine digestive system, simulated horses and cows, model horses for research, margaret evans, learning about horse health

“I used to build props and worked in film and television production, and I had a shop in my garage at home,” says Russ Gray, cofounder of Veterinary Simulator Industries (VSI) in Calgary, Alberta. “My neighbour was the dean for the University of Calgary’s new Veterinary School. He knew that I built weird things, so he asked me if I could build the back end of a cow just to garner some interest for the new school at the agricultural fair in Calgary. He wanted the back end of three cows so that kids could reach up into the rectum and palpate a calf’s head. I contacted my business partner, Bryan Pfahl, and we created them for him. At the time we were doing all kinds of jobs for science centres and things like that during the course of our careers, so we just took it on as another project.”

mark andrews equine science update, the donkey sanctuary, what climate do donkeys like, how are donkeys different from horses and mules, university of portsmouth applied animal behavioural science

We might associate donkeys with Christmas, but new research from the University of Portsmouth shows the animals prefer hotter periods of the year. Donkeys, it seems, love sun and warmth. That’s the finding of the first study to examine the conditions under which healthy (non-working) donkeys and mules seek shelter in hot, dry climates.

how to keep my horse healthy and happy, equine guelph, international society for equitation science (ISES), hartpury equine science

Astute horse owners realize that their horse’s welfare is about more than having food, water, and appropriate shelter. The horse’s emotional well-being, also known as their quality of life, is an important piece of the welfare puzzle. However, it is unclear what measurements are accurate and reliable enough to help objectively assess this area of a horse’s welfare. A group of researchers from the United Kingdom, New Zealand, and Australia have teamed up to address this.

should i use a noseband on horse, types of horse nosebands, why use a noseband horse, ises noseband pressure, how much pressure horse noseband

If you use a flash or drop noseband, you may be surprised at the results of a recent preliminary equine study. Jayne Peters from Bishop Burton College, UK and her research team investigated three different noseband designs and their effect on rein tension and the force being exerted on the frontal nasal plane of horses whilst being ridden. These findings were presented at the 15th annual International Society for Equitation Science (ISES) conference, August 19, 2019, at the University of Guelph in Ontario.

does my horse have allergies? stable allergies horses, how to reduce dust in horse barn, equine asthma, spirulina for horses

Like humans, horses can be hypersensitive to a wide variety of allergen triggers including insect bites, pollens, dust and molds, chemicals in crop sprays, hay dust, stall bedding materials, wool (sometimes in saddle pad and blanket products), grooming sprays, shampoos, synthetic materials such as neoprene found in boots and pads, medications, supplements, and some ingredients in feed pellets.

exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage thoroughbreds, horses eiph, ontario veterinary college equine studies

Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage (EIPH) is estimated to affect between 44 – 85 percent of Thoroughbreds and up to 87 percent of Standardbreds worldwide. There is concern in racing circles that EIPH can shorten a racehorse’s career and in rare worst-case scenarios, cause sudden death from massive hemorrhage. Dr. Janet Beeler-Marfisi (Ontario Veterinary College, Department of Pathobiology) and her collaborators plan to use data from air quality monitoring stations and weather stations near Woodbine and Woodbine Mohawk Park racetracks in Ontario, cross referenced with endoscopic exams, to determine if there are patterns between EIPH and horses exercising in areas of increased air pollution or in cooler temperatures.

Equiwinner™n equine Electrolytes equine hydration horse impaction colic signal health electrolyte patch horse

Making Electrolytes Smart - Does your horse have a drinking problem? Good hydration is not just about how much a horse drinks, it’s also about how the water is used internally. A properly hydrated horse with balanced electrolytes will be healthier and perform better. A dehydrated horse is at increased risk of impaction colic and reduced athletic potential.

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