Illness & Injury

A new gene therapy shows promise for treating tendon injuries according to a report published in the journal Frontiers in Veterinary Science. The authors claim the technique gives much faster healing than current methods and could significantly reduce relapse rates.

Racehorses need their breath to run their best. But inflammatory airway disease (IAD) can rob them of their stamina. New research in the Ontario Veterinary College at the University of Guelph shows the disease is much more common than previously thought.

Researchers at the University of Guelph are searching for clues to better manage a virus that can cause late gestation abortion in mares. Horses carrying equine herpesvirus (EHV) may exhibit signs as minor as a runny nose and mild fever, but the virus is a major cause of neurological, respiratory, and reproductive disease, including abortions, in the equine industry.

Equine Sports Therapy, Alexa Linton, equine cranial bones, equine skull

The equine skull has thirty-four bones, while the human skull is made up of twenty-two bones of which eight are cranial bones and fourteen are facial bones. That is quite a number of bones making up our noggins and those of our horses. But what do they all do? That’s a great question with a complex answer.

equine respiratory ailments, horse barn air quality, horse care, horse barn drainage, horse barn ventilation, equine respiratory system, horse bedding

Horses are naturally designed to live outside. With shelter from the wind and elements and access to fresh water and good quality hay, most horses can live quite comfortably surrounded by their companions without a stable. This is not always a convenient option for their human counterparts.

equine eye cancer research milestone, equine eye loss, horse eye loss, squamous cell carcinoma, equine eye, Dr. Rebecca Bellone, University of California Davis equine eye cancer research , Haflingers, DDB2 binds DNA damaged by ultraviolet light,  equine DNA, equine eye tumour, horse eye tumour, methionine, threonine

For a prey animal that instinctively depends on sight for survival, a horse’s loss of vision or even the loss of an eye is devastating. Yet, squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common cancer found in equine eyes and the second most common tumour in horses.

horse self-mutilation syndrome,  Lynne Gunville, Dr. Claire Card, horse skin, unusual horse noises, flank biting, equine self-mutilation syndrome, horse care

At first, you might notice something wrong with your horse’s skin. He may start making unusual noises or being hypersensitive to your touch in the flank area – signs that would normally point to a medical issue such as a dermatological condition.

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