Illness & Injury

clinical signs of equine gastric ulcer syndrome, understanding equine stomach, what are equine gastric lesions? what is equine hyperkeratosis? clinical signs of EGUS

If you’ve ever had a gastric ulcer, you’re familiar with the burning or gnawing feeling in your stomach area that is typical of peptic ulceration of the stomach lining. This pain may last for anywhere from half an hour to four hours, and can occur after eating or even during the night, disrupting sleep. Nobody wants to live with pain or discomfort, and the average person would not hesitate to seek treatment for gastric ulcers.

removing ticks from horses, equine guelph, how to get rid of a tick on my horse

Ticks are a nuisance that can often go undetected. Because of the risk of disease transmission (Lyme disease, Anaplasmosis, Equine piroplasmosis), it is important to frequently examine your horse for the presence of ticks, and to take steps to lower risk of exposure.

breeding horses, should i breed my mare, how to breed mare, how to find stallion, tania millen, merrington warmbloods lisa longtin, cwhba fall classic,

Every spring, mare owners get excited about choosing a stallion for their mare, but many decisions need to be made before selecting the stud and breeding the mare. “Breeding is not for the faint of heart,” says Lisa Longtin. She owns Merrington Warmbloods in Kindersley, Saskatchewan and has been breeding warmblood horses for the dressage and hunter rings for 25 years. “When things go well, it’s great. But there are so many things that can go wrong.”

horse colic, what is equine colic, equine digestive tract, preventing horse colic, treating horse colic, how much water horse, how much exercise horse, what should a horse eat, colic risk rater, equine guelph

If there’s one word that strikes fear in the hearts and minds of horse owners, it’s “colic.” Used to describe any form of abdominal pain, colic can affect horses for many reasons and in any season, although cold weather months are a particularly challenging time with increased risk of impaction-related colic.

collect colostrum, how to collect colostrum for foal, colostrum from mare, orphaned foal

If you have a pregnant mare in your barn, plan ahead to collect and freeze some of her colostrum — that all-important first milk — so you have it on hand if a foal is born without access to this essential liquid.

laminitis, ppid, equine cushing's disease, treating equine cushing's disease, diagnosing equine cushing's disease, equine laminitis, jaini clougher veterinarian

Equine Cushing’s Disease, more correctly called Pars Pituitary Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID), is a non-cancerous but progressive enlargement of the pituitary gland in the horse. It is estimated that 20 percent of horses over the age of 15 will develop PPID. Note that Cushing’s Syndrome in humans and dogs (when not due to giving too much steroidal medication) involves an actual tumour of either the pituitary or the adrenal glands, (either benign or malignant), whereas Cushing’s Disease in horses has a different cause.

Biosecurity horse farm, how to protect horse from virus, pathogens horse farm, designing a horse barn for health, safely transporting horses

Protecting Horses and Humans - With the current COVID-19 pandemic and Canadians’ alarm over how quickly a virus can spread across countries and continents, there is an understandable reaction to protect against infection from any and all viruses and pathogens. By extension, it is also essential that there is a level of biosecurity on your farm or acreage to protect horses against agents of disease.

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