Illness & Injury

horse colic, equine colic, colic surgery, western college of veterinary medicine, wcvm

Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention - Most horse owners have their own personal stories to tell about colic — but chances are that everyone’s tales about the dreaded disease are different. Episodes of colic can range from a mild case of abdominal pain that resolves with pain medications to a life-threatening event that requires emergency surgical treatment. With such a variable condition, it can be difficult for horse owners to determine the right course of action for their horse’s situation, says Dr. Carolina Duran, a resident in large animal internal medicine at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

equine first aid, horse choking, horse wound, equi-health, horse first aid

What do you do when you are faced with a health emergency with your horse? Would you be prepared? Many owners don’t feel they are equipped physically – and emotionally – to deal with a first aid emergency situation involving their horse, be it wire cuts, trailering injuries, stings, burns, puncture wounds, digestive distress, or something less dramatic but potentially just as serious.

Equine Lameness, western college of veterinary medicine, wcvm, horse lameness, game ready, equine ultrasound, equine heel pain

Accurate diagnosis is critical - A lame horse often means a sudden change in plans, and a lameness diagnosis during the summer is an especially disappointing way to end the show season for a horse and its rider. In addition to conventional lameness therapies, newer treatments such as shock wave therapy, cold compression therapy, and regenerative therapies that use the body’s natural ability to heal may help to return horses to the show ring more quickly.

mud fever horses, equine mud fever, supplements for equine mud fever, vetcur, stone hedge farms, Cur1, DiVet, ImVet

This time of year it is a constant battle with the mud and our horses are at risk of getting mud fever. Mud fever is not a single disease but can come in different forms. The condition occurs especially in warm, wet weather, and is certainly not limited to horses that are paddling in knee-deep mud. Mud fever starts off with dry crusts, which are caused by the inflamed skin weeping. The condition can range from a mild skin irritation to very painful infected sores, and can in some cases cause significant swelling with severe lameness.

Equine Tying Up Syndrome, pssm, rer, polysaccharide storage myopathy recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis Fabienne Uehlinger Western College of Veterinary Medicine WCVM

There are two simple words that describe painful, exercise-associated muscle cramping in a horse: tying up. While the traditional tying up usually occurs after a long hard ride, some horses can tie up repeatedly for no immediately obvious reason. Regardless of the underlying cause, the clinical signs are similar. And in most cases, affected horses require immediate veterinary care, says Dr. Fabienne Uehlinger of the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

Equine Pain, horse pain, grimaces score, equineguelph, grimace pain scale

Hiding pain is one of the top survival skills of the horse. An important part of horse ownership is learning to recognize the signs a horse may be in discomfort rather than dismissing certain subtle cues as just bad behaviour. Earlier this year, Dr. Brianne Henderson gave a well-received lecture to a room full of horse owners in Hillsburgh, ON. The attendees were interested in ensuring the welfare of their equine companions by honing their skills for detecting pain.

equine guelph, Senior Horse Challenge, Equine Metabolic Syndrome, EMS, Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction, PPID, Cushing’s Disease, Laminitis

What differentiates Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) from Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID) or “Cushing’s Disease”? A) Laminitis, B) Obesity or regional adiposity ("fat pads"), C) Delayed shedding

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