Taxonomy term

nutrition for the foal, calcium for mare and foal, creep feed system, shelagh niblock, deveopmental orthopedic disease equines

Managing Nutrition for Safe Growth in Young Horses - For any horse owner, the birth of a foal is always an eagerly awaited event. That baby, the product of the carefully planned mating of two superior parents, can elicit a range of emotions for the owner, including excitement and awe, but often anxiety and worry as well. One of the concerns the owner of a newborn foal may have involves the risk of the foal developing developmental orthopedic disease (DOD), which is a name applied to a group of conditions that can affect the growing foal, including physitis, acquired angular limb deformities, flexural deformities, cervical vertebral malformations, acquired vertebral deformities, and finally, osteochondrosis (OC).

The Forces of Evil: 13 Equine Diseases

No owner wants to see their horse suffer. An appropriate equine vaccination program is one way to help ensure your horse's longevity and quality of life. When you vaccinate your horse against any number of diseases, you are protecting him from experiencing the devastating symptoms caused by any of the following:

equine diseases, diseases in horses, fragile foal syndrome, genetic variety foals, diseases in foals, plod1 mutation, wffs horses

Warmblood Fragile Foal Syndrome Type 1 (WFFS) is an inherited defect of connective tissue characterized by hyperextensible, abnormally thin, fragile skin and mucous membranes that are subject to open lesions. Affected horses may also have hyperextensible limb joints, floppy ears, accumulation of fluid (hydrops), subcutaneous emphysema, hematomas, and premature birth. The disease is present at birth and affected newborn foals are euthanized shortly after birth due to the poor prognosis of this untreatable condition.

Preventing Fall Winter Colic, horse colic, equine colic, winter colic horses, fall colic horses, seasonal colic for horses, horse feed, horse forage, horse water, horse drink, ill horse, sick horse, horse disease, horse care, horse health

By Gayle Ecker - The fall is a time of lovely colours, family get-togethers and winding down the busy show season. However, fall is often a time of increased colic calls to veterinarians. While not all colic can be prevented, paying attention to your management of the horse can go a long way to decrease the incidence, and the suffering of episodes.

shelagh niblock horse nutrition, horse's diet ppid, equine cushings disease, tying up horse, metabolic conditions horse, pssm type 1 and 2 horses

Receiving a diagnosis of the condition behind your horse’s health or performance problem is usually a relief, but the satisfaction of getting the diagnosis can be quickly replaced by fear and uncertainty regarding what to do about it. Questions around both the long-term prospects for your horse and the costs involved to support the horse with such a condition can be daunting. Owners of horses diagnosed with special nutritional needs often feel bewildered and frustrated as they attempt to put together an appropriate management protocol.

equine diseases, diseases in horses, genetic varient thoroughbred foals, efih in foals, diseases affecting foals, plos genetics, uc davic center for equine health

Testing Now Available - Researchers at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine have identified a genetic cause for the fatal condition, equine familial isolated hypoparathyroidism (EFIH), in Thoroughbreds, marking the first genetic variant for hypoparathyroidism identified in any domestic animal species. Additionally, this is the first widely available genetic test for Thoroughbreds.

symptoms equine coronavirus, treatment of equine coronavirus, can equine coronavirus pass to humans? ECoV, UC Davis Center for Equine Health

Coronaviruses are known to cause illness in a variety of species and tend to attack specific organ systems such as the respiratory or gastrointestinal tracts. Genetically, equine coronavirus (ECoV) appears to be a close relative of bovine coronavirus. There is currently no evidence that equine or bovine coronaviruses are likely to be infectious to humans. However, it is always advisable to follow basic biosecurity protocols when handling sick animals.

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