Taxonomy term

Equine Lameness Evaluation, Dr. Crystal Lee, equine disorder, horse lameness, examining horse, horse flexion test

Equine lameness is an indication of a structural or functional disorder, in one or more limbs or the spine, evident while the horse is standing or in movement. It can range from very mild discomfort, which may only be perceived by the owner or trainer as a decrease in level of performance, to severe pain in which the horse is unwilling to bear weight on the limb. As one of the most common and most expensive medical problems in horses, lameness represents a large concern to the equine industry as well as to individual horse owners.

horse heaves, equine heaves, horse lungs, equine lung disease

Heaves is a chronic, non-infectious lung disease that primarily affects mature horses and can have a significant effect on a horse’s well-being and performance ability. Heaves is also referred to as recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) and is often compared to human asthma. The primary pathologic mechanisms leading to clinical signs in affected horses are bronchospasm, inflammation and thickening of the lower airways (small bronchi), and accumulation of mucus and inflammatory exudates in the airway lumen. The term RAO indicates that the disease is chronic and recurrent, although “remission” from clinical signs can be achieved through treatment and proper management of affected horses.

equine Laminitis in Horses with EMS and Cushing’s Disorder, Dr. Jaini Clougher ECIR Group. Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) and Cushing’s disorder (PPID) phenylbutazone (Bute) horse is rocked back onto its haunches therapeutic hoof boots with pads vitamin e laminitis

Equine laminitis has been with us for a long, long time. Fortunately, in the last 10 to 20 years there have been great strides in understanding the causes of this terrible condition. Laminitis is now regarded as a syndrome that occurs secondary to something else, rather than a discreet disease all in itself. This has allowed much more focused research and effort in treating the cause rather than treating just the symptoms that occur in the hoof. It doesn’t matter how great the trim is, or what shoes are used, or how deep the bedding. If initiating causes such as EMS (Equine Metabolic Syndrome – see Equine Metabolic Syndrome & Equine Cushing’s Disease, Early Summer 2018 issue of Canadian Horse Journal) or PPID (Cushing’s disorder) are not addressed, the laminitis and the pain will continue.

sleep deprived horse, how much sleep does a horse need, do horses need lots of sleep, can a horse sleep standing up, ises, international society of equitation sceince

Sleep is essential for life. The quality and quantity of a horse’s sleep directly affects their health and well-being. However, sleep is rarely considered as part of a horse’s management plan. A new study has found that poor management or physical problems can lead to horses becoming sleep deprived and at risk of serious injury.

equine asthma latex, are horses allergic to latex, can latex cause equine asthma, researcher sam white nottingham trent

A study into the causes of severe equine asthma (sEA) has revealed associations with over 113 substances, including latex found in artificial surfaces. Lead researcher Sam White found that natural rubber latex was among “the most surprising and significant” of several new allergens present in the dust horses breathe.

horses bits and breathing, david mellor massey university, equine breathing exercise, equine guelph horse portal

Bits and breathing. Both words start with the letter “b” and most might assume their relationship ends there. But Dr. David Mellor, a leading animal welfare expert at Massey University in New Zealand, believes there is more to the story, especially when it comes to our horses. His research, shared in a talk at the University of Guelph in autumn 2017, looks at how bit use can impact equine breathing during exercise and what this means for equine welfare.

drug resistance horses, british equine veterinary association, multiple drug resistance equine levels

Multiple drug resistance (MDR) among bacteria isolated from equine clinical samples is at a concerning level, according to work presented at the recent British Equine Veterinary Association conference.

does my horse have allergies? stable allergies horses, how to reduce dust in horse barn, equine asthma, spirulina for horses

Like humans, horses can be hypersensitive to a wide variety of allergen triggers including insect bites, pollens, dust and molds, chemicals in crop sprays, hay dust, stall bedding materials, wool (sometimes in saddle pad and blanket products), grooming sprays, shampoos, synthetic materials such as neoprene found in boots and pads, medications, supplements, and some ingredients in feed pellets.

exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage thoroughbreds, horses eiph, ontario veterinary college equine studies

Exercise-Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage (EIPH) is estimated to affect between 44 – 85 percent of Thoroughbreds and up to 87 percent of Standardbreds worldwide. There is concern in racing circles that EIPH can shorten a racehorse’s career and in rare worst-case scenarios, cause sudden death from massive hemorrhage. Dr. Janet Beeler-Marfisi (Ontario Veterinary College, Department of Pathobiology) and her collaborators plan to use data from air quality monitoring stations and weather stations near Woodbine and Woodbine Mohawk Park racetracks in Ontario, cross referenced with endoscopic exams, to determine if there are patterns between EIPH and horses exercising in areas of increased air pollution or in cooler temperatures.

horse allergies, equine asthma, latex allergies in horses, does latex bother horses, morris animal foundation, royal agricultural university

Evidence Suggests Previously Unrecognized Latex Allergies May Play Role in Equine Asthma - Evidence Suggests Previously Unrecognized Latex Allergies May Plan Role in Equine Asthma - Latex exposure could be detrimental to a horse’s respiratory health. That’s the surprising discovery from Morris Animal Foundation-funded research at the Royal Agricultural University and University of Nottingham.

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