Taxonomy term

What is Equine Recurrent Uveitis (eru), UC Davis Center for Equine Health, moon blindness HORSES, IS MY HORSE BLIND? types of horses that go blind, insidious uveitis

Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU), also known as moon blindness, is the most common cause of blindness in horses worldwide. It affects 2 to 25 percent of horses globally, with 56 percent of affected horses eventually becoming blind. More than 60 percent of affected horses are unable to return to previous levels of work. ERU is most often characterized by repeated episodes of inflammation of the uveal tract of the eye (the middle layer), involving one or both eyes. A subclinical manifestation, known as insidious uveitis, does not present as outwardly painful episodes, and instead is consistent low grade inflammation (not episodic) that causes cumulative damage to the eye. Cumulative damage caused by ERU can lead to cataracts, glaucoma, and eventually blindness. Although not all horses that experience a single episode of uveitis will develop ERU, they are at risk for disease.

Diseases resulting in Hind Limb Gait Deficits in Horses, stringhalt in horses, Fibrotic Myopathy in horses, Shivers in Horses, Equine Polysaccharide Storage Myopathy PSSM

By Dr. Colin Scruton - Hind limb problems can be confusing to identify and even harder to diagnose in horses. Some conditions can lead to mechanical deficits or difficulty in certain movements without causing the classic pain-associated lameness. Stringhalt, fibrotic myopathy, shivers, and equine polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM) are four distinct diseases in horses that result in gait deficits. Accurate differentiation of these conditions allows for the most effective management to be used.

honey in  horse surgery, colic operation horses, equine colic, horse infection honey, dr kajsa gustafsson large animal medicine and colic, equine science update mark andrews

Abdominal surgery is a major undertaking in horses, and not without significant risks to the patient. Colic operations, especially those that involve opening the gut wall, risk contaminating the wound with bacteria. One of the most common complications after equine abdominal surgery is surgical site infection (SSI) of the abdominal incision.

Night Blindness horses, is my horse blind, equine gene mutations, preventing blindless horse, electroretinography horses, csnb2 horse

Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is the inability to see in low to no-light conditions (essentially dusk to dawn). It is found in horses with two copies of a specific white spotting pattern mutation known as leopard complex spotting (LP), which is characterized by a symmetrical white pattern centered over the rump with few or no spots of pigment in this white patterned area. This coat pattern is common in Appaloosas, Miniature Horses, Knabstruppers, Norikers, and some other breeds.

Microchips in horses, taking a horse's temperature, how to tell if horse overheating, signs of horse too hot, equine science update, mark andrews

Horses undertaking strenuous or prolonged exercise in hot and humid environments may produce heat more quickly than they can lose it, putting them at risk of postexercise exertional heat illness. Early detection of the clinical signs of exertional heat illness and adequate treatments are important to prevent severe hyperthermia and irreversible thermal damage.

horse strangles, boarding barn strangles, stable strangles, equine strangles, streptococcus equi subspecies equi, equine antibioities, dr ashley boyle penn vet

What do you do when a horse at your boarding barn has been diagnosed with strangles? How is it treated and managed? How vulnerable is your own horse to getting strangles? And how do you know when the sick horse is truly disease-free?

nutrition for the foal, calcium for mare and foal, creep feed system, shelagh niblock, deveopmental orthopedic disease equines

Managing Nutrition for Safe Growth in Young Horses - For any horse owner, the birth of a foal is always an eagerly awaited event. That baby, the product of the carefully planned mating of two superior parents, can elicit a range of emotions for the owner, including excitement and awe, but often anxiety and worry as well. One of the concerns the owner of a newborn foal may have involves the risk of the foal developing developmental orthopedic disease (DOD), which is a name applied to a group of conditions that can affect the growing foal, including physitis, acquired angular limb deformities, flexural deformities, cervical vertebral malformations, acquired vertebral deformities, and finally, osteochondrosis (OC).

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