Taxonomy term

Equine Tying Up Syndrome, pssm, rer, polysaccharide storage myopathy recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis Fabienne Uehlinger Western College of Veterinary Medicine WCVM

There are two simple words that describe painful, exercise-associated muscle cramping in a horse: tying up. While the traditional tying up usually occurs after a long hard ride, some horses can tie up repeatedly for no immediately obvious reason. Regardless of the underlying cause, the clinical signs are similar. And in most cases, affected horses require immediate veterinary care, says Dr. Fabienne Uehlinger of the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan.

Equine Pain, horse pain, grimaces score, equineguelph, grimace pain scale

Hiding pain is one of the top survival skills of the horse. An important part of horse ownership is learning to recognize the signs a horse may be in discomfort rather than dismissing certain subtle cues as just bad behaviour. Earlier this year, Dr. Brianne Henderson gave a well-received lecture to a room full of horse owners in Hillsburgh, ON. The attendees were interested in ensuring the welfare of their equine companions by honing their skills for detecting pain.

equine guelph, Senior Horse Challenge, Equine Metabolic Syndrome, EMS, Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction, PPID, Cushing’s Disease, Laminitis

What differentiates Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) from Pituitary Pars Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID) or “Cushing’s Disease”? A) Laminitis, B) Obesity or regional adiposity ("fat pads"), C) Delayed shedding

headshaking horse, equine headshaking, horse shaking head, headshaking syndrome, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pens neuromodulation

All horses will shake their heads to rid themselves of flies, dust, or a minor discomfort. It is a simple reflex action. But when it is persistent, intense, almost dangerous, and the horse is jerking his head up, rubbing, blowing, or constantly shaking as though a fly flew up his nose, it’s time to take a much closer look.

equine navicular, horse navicular, navicular syndrome horse, horse hooves, navicular disease horses, horse lameness

If you have ever experienced the relief that comes after exchanging ill-fitting shoes for a more comfortable pair, you can understand what a horse suffering from navicular disease feels like when it gets a set of corrective shoes.

pssm horse, polysaccharide storage mypathy horses, muscle disease horse, quarter horse pssm, muscle cramping horse, tying up horse

Polysaccharide storage myopathy or PSSM is a muscle disease that occurs primarily in horses with Quarter Horse bloodlines such as Quarter Horses, Paint Horses, and Appaloosas. PSSM also occurs in other breeds including Drafts, Draft crossbreeds, and Warmbloods. The primary clinical sign of this disease is muscle cramping or tying-up; however, clinical signs may vary with different breeds and severity. There are several different abbreviations used to describe polysaccharide storage myopathy including PSSM, EPSM and EPSSM. Tying-up also occurs in other breeds of horses such as Thoroughbreds and Standardbreds, but this form of tying-up has a different cause.

equine laminitis, horse laminitis, nsc, acth, horse pituitary gland, horse metabolic syndrome, equine metabolic syndrome, horse hay analysis, juliet getty

Horses are more likely to suffer from laminitis in the fall than at any other time of year. Two reasons are the high NSC (non-structural carbohydrates) from cooler nighttime temperatures and increased blood ACTH (adrenocorticotropic hormone) secretion from the pituitary gland. Both of these lead to elevated insulin.

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