Taxonomy term

what is eastern western equine encephalitis, eee diseases, horse diseases viral, testing for diseases horses, vaccine horses, culex tarsalis horses

Eastern equine encephalitis virus (EEE), also known as sleeping sickness, and Western Equine Encephalitis (WEE) are viral diseases that cause inflammation of the brain and spinal cord. Wild birds are a natural reservoir for EEE and WEE viruses, and mosquitoes that feed on these birds can transmit the virus to mammals, including horses and humans.

pssm horse, polysaccharide storage mypathy horses, muscle disease horse, quarter horse pssm, muscle cramping horse, tying up horse

Polysaccharide storage myopathy or PSSM is a muscle disease that occurs primarily in horses with Quarter Horse bloodlines such as Quarter Horses, Paint Horses, and Appaloosas. PSSM also occurs in other breeds including Drafts, Draft crossbreeds, and Warmbloods. The primary clinical sign of this disease is muscle cramping or tying-up; however, clinical signs may vary with different breeds and severity. There are several different abbreviations used to describe polysaccharide storage myopathy including PSSM, EPSM and EPSSM. Tying-up also occurs in other breeds of horses such as Thoroughbreds and Standardbreds, but this form of tying-up has a different cause.

west nile virus in horses, equine wnv, elisa test horses, uc davis center for equine health

West Nile virus (WNV) is a mosquito-borne virus that affects humans and other animals, of which horses represent 96.9 percent of reported non-human cases. Introduced to the United States in 1999, WNV is now found in all of the contiguous 48 states.

equine respiratory diseases, roa horses, inflammatory airway horse, horse nasal discharge, horse cough, horse nosebleeds

The equine respiratory tract is responsible for many different functions and is, on a basic level, quite similar to the human respiratory tract. One of its primary functions is the exchange of oxygen between the lungs and the red blood cells, which allows oxygen to be delivered to tissues throughout the body and becomes especially important during exercise when the oxygen consumption of the tissues increases. Another important function is the clearance of irritants such as dust, ammonia, and bacteria, from the respiratory tract. This is done by filtering large dust particles in the nose, coughing, sneezing, and trapping irritants in the airway mucus. However, excess nasal discharge, coughing, sneezing, and mucus secretion are all signs that a horse may be suffering from respiratory problems.

Dust Management horse barns, purdue extension, breathing for horses, respiratory disease equine, roa, dust control horse barn, horse barn renovations, better ventilation horse stable

Better Breathing in the Barn - Why should horse owners be worried about the air quality in their equine facilities? Is there really anything that can be done to improve the quality once the barn is built?

horse tossing head, horse resisting bit, does my horse have tmd? horse misbehaving, equine surgery for tmd, wcvm equine tmd research, margaret evans

Does your horse have trouble responding to the bit? Does he hold his head awkwardly at times, or seem to have problems chewing? Does he show unexplained behaviour under saddle or have problems with certain gaits or leads? Or does he toss his head a lot, especially when pressure is applied with his bit or perhaps a hackamore?

Can you get a disease from your horse? Yes, but the good news is that direct horse-to-human disease transmission is rare. Here’s a quick refresher on some bacterial, fungal, parasitic, and viral diseases that can potentially be transmitted to us directly from the equines in our lives. This list does not include diseases like West Nile virus that can be passed indirectly from horses to humans, for example through an insect bite.

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