Taxonomy term

laminitis, ppid, equine cushing's disease, treating equine cushing's disease, diagnosing equine cushing's disease, equine laminitis, jaini clougher veterinarian

Equine Cushing’s Disease, more correctly called Pars Pituitary Intermedia Dysfunction (PPID), is a non-cancerous but progressive enlargement of the pituitary gland in the horse. It is estimated that 20 percent of horses over the age of 15 will develop PPID. Note that Cushing’s Syndrome in humans and dogs (when not due to giving too much steroidal medication) involves an actual tumour of either the pituitary or the adrenal glands, (either benign or malignant), whereas Cushing’s Disease in horses has a different cause.

Biosecurity horse farm, how to protect horse from virus, pathogens horse farm, designing a horse barn for health, safely transporting horses

Protecting Horses and Humans - With the current COVID-19 pandemic and Canadians’ alarm over how quickly a virus can spread across countries and continents, there is an understandable reaction to protect against infection from any and all viruses and pathogens. By extension, it is also essential that there is a level of biosecurity on your farm or acreage to protect horses against agents of disease.

dr scott weese, infections horses, equine infections, biosecurity, equine guelph, horse health, keeping horse healthy

Dr. Scott Weese, Professor in Pathobiology at Ontario Veterinary College, discusses his research into infection control and bacterial infections in animals and humans.

climate change horse industry, prepare horse farm for climate change, heat dome horses, rescuing horses disaster, hay shortages, colic horses

Climate change is substantially impacting Canadian horses, horse properties, and their owners. Almost 90 percent of Canadians in recent surveys say they’ve already seen climate change effects in their communities. Horses are increasingly affected by respiratory diseases from wildfire smoke and dust; skin disease and damaged hooves from variable weather; and unforeseen parasites and diseases. Horse owners are struggling to purchase hay, treat unexpected health issues, and adapt to weather-related riding limitations. Meanwhile, property owners are repairing damage from sudden storms, drought, excess water, and wind. So, it’s worth understanding how climate change will affect horses and properties into the future, and what you can do to prepare for these changes.

Hypochaeris radicata, stringhalt equine reflex hypertonia, diseases horses, horse walking strange, equine hindlimbs stringhalt, uc davis center for equine health

Stringhalt, or equine reflex hypertonia, is a neuromuscular condition that causes a gait abnormality characterized by involuntary, exaggerated upward movement of one or both of the hindlimbs. It looks like a jerk or hop, with the affected hindlimb(s) snapped up towards the abdomen. This generally occurs with every stride at the walk but can lessen at the trot and is usually absent at the canter. The degree of hyperflexion varies from mild to severe and is most obvious when the horse is turning sharply, backing, going down a slope, in the first few walking steps after standing still, or during gait transitions. A hopping gait may be exhibited in severe cases.

pssm horse, polysaccharide storage mypathy horses, muscle disease horse, quarter horse pssm, muscle cramping horse, tying up horse

Polysaccharide storage myopathy or PSSM is a muscle disease that occurs primarily in horses with Quarter Horse bloodlines such as Quarter Horses, Paint Horses, and Appaloosas. PSSM also occurs in other breeds including Drafts, Draft crossbreeds, and Warmbloods. The primary clinical sign of this disease is muscle cramping or tying-up; however, clinical signs may vary with different breeds and severity. There are several different abbreviations used to describe polysaccharide storage myopathy including PSSM, EPSM and EPSSM. Tying-up also occurs in other breeds of horses such as Thoroughbreds and Standardbreds, but this form of tying-up has a different cause.

ehv-1 research, ontario veterinary college research, horse infection control, virus isolation horses, equine guelph

“Most horses have been exposed to the equine herpesvirus,” says Dr. Diego Gomez-Nieto, researcher at the Ontario Veterinary College. Gomez has been part of a research study on the equine herpesvirus (EHV) which discovered the nasal microbiota of infected horses differed significantly from those of a healthy control group. The study came together quickly and was conducted on a horse farm in Ontario that was experiencing an outbreak. The January 2021 research paper explains nasal bacterial microbiota of healthy horses is richer and more diverse than previously reported using culture-based methodology.

types of flexural limb deformity foal, abnormal foal fetal development, foal malnutrition diseases, uc davic center for equine health

Flexural limb deformity occurs in two forms. The first form, also known as contracted tendons, clubfoot, or knuckling, is the inability to extend a limb fully. The condition may be present at birth (congenital) due to improper positioning in the uterus (which can lead to dystocia in the mare), abnormal fetal development, disease or malnutrition in the dam; or acquired as the result of nutrition (abrupt changes in amount or quality of feed leading to rapid growth), polyarthritis, trauma, or disease. It is a common condition in foals, usually occurring anytime from birth to 14 months of age.

cryptosporidiosis horses, gastrointestinal diseases foals, horses gastrointestinal disease, sick foal, parasites in horses, uc davis center for equine health

Commonly seen in young foals, this infection can be fatal if left untreated. Parasites in the genus Cryptosporidium are an important source of gastrointestinal disease in humans and animals globally. These highly contagious parasites infect the intestine and cause diarrhea and weight loss.

equine rotavirus, foal diarrhea, diseases in foals, uc davis center for equine health, horse elisa test

A common cause of diarrhea in foals less than six months old. Equine rotavirus damages the lining of the intestines, inhibiting digestion and absorption of food. It is one of the most common causes of diarrhea in foals less than six months of age. Foals become infected when they ingest materials or lick surfaces contaminated with infected feces.

Pages