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free choice feeding, pasture for horses, equine cushin's disease, eleanor m. kellon, vmd, equine cushings, pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction, ppid

The advice to allow free access to food for an obese horse is doomed to failure. Too much food is how they got that way in the first place. Things like age, metabolic rate, and activity level can influence what calorie requirements are, but it still boils down to too many calories in versus calories burned. The same is true for overweight cats, dogs, and people.

horse illness mosquito-borne, eastern equine encephalitis, western equine encephalitis

Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), also known as sleeping sickness, is a viral disease that affects horses, some other animals, and humans. EEE occurs in the Eastern half of North America, most commonly on the Eastern seaboard and the Gulf coast. It is also found in Central and South America and the Caribbean.

equine enteroliths, pebbles in manure, horse manure stones, colic causes horses, should i feed alfalfa to my horse?

Enteroliths are mineral accumulations of magnesium-ammonium-phosphate (struvite) around a foreign object (a piece of metal, pebble, baling twine, hair, rubber) that form round, triangular, or flat stones inside the bowel, usually over the course of multiple years. They form in the large colon of horses, where they can remain for some time until they move and cause an obstruction in the large or small colon, resulting in colic.

Hay Testing with NIRS, By Shelagh Niblock, PAS, hay forage analysis, overweight horse, equine metabolic conditions, cushing's disease horses, wet chemistry hay testing

Does It Make Sense for You This Year? Accurate laboratory analysis is the backbone of efficient ration planning for many horse owners today. Whether you have an elite competition horse or a senior who is essentially a pet, horse owners are becoming increasingly aware that informed forage buying decisions can make a significant difference in the health and performance of their horse.

equine spinal problems, equine musculoskeletal system, equine Wobbler Syndrome, equine Neck radiographs, equine Thoracolumbar Spine, equine Pelvic Palpation

The musculoskeletal system of the horse is an incredible machine — strong, fast, efficient, and capable of performing feats as varied as jumping obstacles and roping cattle. However, horse owners are all too aware of the fact that despite this amazing athletic ability, the equine body can be remarkably fragile. If one owns horses long enough, he or she is bound to encounter a disorder of the equine musculoskeletal system.

obese horses, obese pony, overweight pony, overweight horse, equine laminitis

Feeding a mixture of barley straw and hay is a safe and cost-effective way of promoting weight loss in grazing ponies over winter, according to recent research. Obesity is a widespread problem in pleasure horses and ponies. In the past, it was accepted that horses and ponies would lose weight over the winter and then gain weight in the spring when grazing quality improved. Nowadays, however, horses are fed to maintain condition over the winter, and, at the same time, they may be doing less work.

Bellyaches, Blockages, & Bloating in Horses: Colic Causes & Recovery

Chances are very good that anyone who keeps horses for several years will encounter colic at some time. Mild episodes may resolve on their own before a veterinarian can arrive and more serious equine abdominal discomfort can often be managed with medication.

equine navicular, petroglyph animal hospital, horse hoof problems, equine hoof problems, equine coffin joint, equine bute

First let’s begin by locating the navicular bone in the horse. Each of your horse’s hooves contains two bones: the distal phalanx (coffin bone or P3) and the distal sesamoid bone (navicular bone). The navicular bone is a small, boat-shaped bone that is bordered by the coffin bone, middle phalanx (P2), and deep digital flexor tendon (DDFT). It is approximately six centimetres in length and two centimetres in width in the average 1200 pound horse.

equine colic surgery, horse colic surgery, what happens after colic surgery

Colic is a common problem in horses, and although many cases will respond quickly to medical treatment, some do not, and surgical intervention is required to correct the problem. This is not something to be undertaken lightly. There are risks associated with general anaesthesia and with the surgical procedure itself. A period of convalescence lasting months will likely be required. A further concern is the risk that the horse will not regain its original athletic ability.

 Treatment For Equine Joint Infections, morris animal foundation, equine orthopaedic surgery, north carolina university equine, laminitis and joints horse

A new therapy could help overcome joint infections in horses. Researchers at North Carolina State University developed a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) lysate that, when teamed with antibiotics, can eradicate bacterial biofilms common in joint infections. The work, which received funding from the Morris Animal Foundation, has been published in the Journal of Orthopaedic Research.

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