Schooling

starting out right horse foot, nancy tapley, horse warm-up, Karen brain, horse riding technique, horse training

When we go to the gym we all know that a good warm-up session is essential when it comes to protecting against such injuries as pulled muscles or strained tendons and ligaments. There is no difference when it comes to your horse’s workout. Many horses spend 23 hours of each day standing around in relatively small paddocks.

starting out right horse foot, nancy tapley, horse warm-up, Karen brain, horse riding technique, horse training, Shannon Dueck, horse leg yield, equine leg yield, horse leg yield circle, hunter jumper exercises, Leg-Yielding Out Circle

In the previous article, we covered the general principles of a good warm-up and the reasons why it’s an essential part of every ride. Now we’ll continue to focus on the warm-up with a look at some basic exercises designed to prepare your horse physically and mentally for the workout session.

Will Clinging, solving horse behavioural issues, overcoming equine behaviour issues, equine psychology

If I didn’t trust my own judgment about behaviour I would often take a horse down the wrong path. The corrections I make and the responses I encourage are all based on the assumption that I understand the intention behind a horse’s action. If I misinterpret an action, I could easily reprimand a horse for an unintentional action or inadvertently reward a response that was unwanted.

Desensitizing the "Quirky" Horse

By Lindsay Grice - I’ve had several horses in my program that, despite their talent, were extremely frustrating in their early competitive years. After investing many years of consistent training they eventually desensitized to the situations that would formerly set them off. Now, as mature horses, they are successful, versatile competitors.

Master sitting trot, Sandra Verda-Zanatta, fit to ride, equine Hip Flexor stretch, equine quadriceps Stretch, equine hamstritng stretch, equine abdominal mini crunch, equine hamstring stretch, equine interval training, improving equine flexibility, equine hip roll, equine Spine mobility

Ah, sitting trot – the nemesis of so many riders of all ages, levels, and disciplines! In order to develop a balanced, independent seat that does not hinder the horse, but rather allows him to move with maximum ease and efficiency, the rider needs to have flexibility and suppleness through the legs, hips, and lumbar spine (lower back), stability in the pelvis, and strength in the core. These qualities allow the rider to maintain an upright posture that is firm and supple, not rigid, as riding is dynamic and requires a constant repetitive series of muscle contractions.

Lindsay Grice, connecting with your horse, long horse necks, tense horse neck, stretch horse long and low, graceful horse neck

Unfortunately, when a horse is tense through her neck and spine, there is no way to achieve that long, swinging trot and slow legged canter that we desire. Instead of lengthening, she just gets quick. The solution is to teach your mare that it is “safe” to stretch long and low and to fill out the frame of the box.

conditioning for equine soundness, equine cardiovascular fitness, long slow distance training horses, proper horse shoeing, strengthening horse on firm ground, Lesley Stevenson

By Lesley Stevenson - Throughout the world, horsemen employ many different methods of conditioning the horse. And indeed there are quite a few different "programs" that result in a fit athlete. But most programs focus on the aspects of the horse's fitness that are the most visible - their musculature and their aerobic capacity (cardiovascular fitness) - without enough thought to strengthening bones, tendons, and ligaments.

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