Hunter Jumper

conditioning for equine soundness, equine cardiovascular fitness, long slow distance training horses, proper horse shoeing, strengthening horse on firm ground, Lesley Stevenson

By Lesley Stevenson - Throughout the world, horsemen employ many different methods of conditioning the horse. And indeed there are quite a few different "programs" that result in a fit athlete. But most programs focus on the aspects of the horse's fitness that are the most visible - their musculature and their aerobic capacity (cardiovascular fitness) - without enough thought to strengthening bones, tendons, and ligaments.

Quality Contact

By Lesley Stevenson - What should you feel in your hands when your horse is going correctly on the flat? I think many riders are unsure of what they should be looking for. What a rider feels in their hands is a direct correlation to the state of the horse's back and hindquarters.

What Makes a Good Hunter?

By Alan Korotkin - What makes a successful show hunter? Judges and horse professionals are in constant search of the perfect hunter that can win, or be sold for large amounts of money. Certain qualities exist that separate the good hunter from the bad. The first and most important quality a good hunter must have is solid form over his jumps. The second is his movement across the ground – how he walks, trots, and canters. The third criteria is the horse’s mind – how he thinks and his personality.

Straighten Your Horse for a Safer Ride over Fences

With Sarah Bradley - “Straightness refers to how the horse positions his body, and his ability to use both sides of his body evenly, providing even propulsion from both hind legs and carrying even weight on both front legs. It's about the rider’s ability to place the horse’s body on the line the rider wishes to travel. A horse is straight when the bird’s eye view shows the horse’s spine as being directly on the line of travel. Thus, a horse on a circle is ‘straight’ when it compresses the inside of its body and lengthens the outside, so that its spine follows the circle.”

Lindsay Grice, Horsewise, horse training, riding canter, self-carriage horse, riding self-carriage, English horse, Western horse, horsemanship, establishing limits and expectations in horses

By Lindsay Grice - Boundaries. When dealing with kids or horses we do them a favour by establishing limits and expectations. When boundaries shift or are not well communicated, dullness, distraction, and resentment can arise.

When Things Go Wrong in the Show Ring...

By Lindsay Grice - Highlighting the common mistakes judges see riders making in the show ring, and how to prevent them is important. We should consider why things go wrong in the first place. From minor errors such as a chip before a hunter fence or a slight over-spin in reining, to major blunders like a refusal or a spook (after which everything disintegrates), the source of the problem can often be found through the science of equine behaviour.

From Flat to Fences

By Lindsay Grice - A secure seat, a deep heel, and following hands are essential for a rider to jump well. Log some miles in a deep heeled, two-point position at the canter and over ground poles. This is a great leg and back strengthener.

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