Fitness

You are one of the biggest factors in whether or not your horse can move with balance and relaxation. In this article I’d like to discuss some factors that affect your ability to have that balanced and independent seat, and outline some exercises you can do to help.

It’s that time of year again. Whether your show season is starting up again in the next couple of months, or you’re just planning on spending more time in the saddle, some off-horse training can help with stamina, effective aids, posture, and reducing risk of injury when working with your horse.

Riding can be a fantastic growth opportunity for children. Like any other sport, riding provides ample circumstances for children to learn great life skills like good sportsmanship, responsibility, commitment, and active lifestyle habits. Being in a relationship with another living creature and accomplishing tasks together adds further benefits.

As riders, younger children are best introduced to as wide a variety of equestrian disciplines as possible. There is plenty of time for them to specify as they mature and start to show clear strengths and tendencies. In the meantime, fostering a healthy sportsmanship and leadership attitude, and other qualities such as patience and self-discipline early on, will provide them with psychological tools to excel under pressure later in life.

Heather Sansom, horse riding fitness, Amy Millar, equine fitness, horse rider fitness, optimal horse riding fitness

In "How the Pros Stay Fit to Ride, Part 1", I interviewed some of our top Canadian dressage riders to see what they did to cross-train for riding. In this article, I am happy to bring you interviews with top Canadian show jumpers Amy Millar and Amanda Hay.

Heather Sansom, horse riding fitness, Ashley Holzer, Danielle Gallagher

You might think that a professional rider can afford to take time to cross-train because they are, after all, a professional athlete. I work with some pros on a weekly basis and I have to tell you, you probably have more personal discretionary time available than they do.

In the previous article, we shared the first half of an interview with para-equestrians Lauren Barwick, Karen Brain, and Judi Island. In this, the second part, they share more about what they do to stay fit to ride and compete, advice for developing riders, athletes, and parents, and how to “be all you can be.”

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