Taxonomy term

lindsay grice, winter horse riding, winter horse training, lindsay grice, horse show season, riding in winter

Fall fairs, circuit championships, and club awards banquets signal the end of another horse show season. So how did it go? Did your shows, rodeos, or competitive trail rides meet your expectations?

Lindsay Grice, prepare for a horse show, showing a horse, how to show a horse, prepare for a dressage test, prepare for a jumper class, prepare for a western class

Seated at the head of the quiet classroom, I watched the students in the classes I teach write their Equine Behaviour and Equine Business final exams, noting the happy faces of smug recognition (“Yes, I studied that!”) and the winces (“Rats, I’d hoped that material wouldn’t be on the test”). I empathize with them. I know what it’s like to sit in the “test seat” – as a student in university and, more recently, writing judging exams. And as a competitive rider, every horse show is a test.

Horse and Rider

If you have been riding for some time, chances are you have come across a mount that challenged you. Or maybe he scared you. Perhaps the horse forced you to face that very difficult question: Is this the wrong horse for me… or is it just me? What can you do when fear cripples your riding experience?

A Willing Trot in Showmanship

By Lindsay Grice - When your horse resists coming forward you will inspire him to do so by dialing up the level of discomfort and immediately releasing the pressure when he trots. Your timing is the key.

Western Performance Horse Bloodlines

By Jess Hallas-Kilcoyne - “Tried and true bloodlines are your best starting point for selecting a prospect, but then you have to go with the horse as an individual because you can have great bloodlines but the horse isn’t always going to live up to the standard of those bloodlines,” says Canadian reining trainer, coach, and competitor Cheryl Mitchell. “Once in a while, you’ll get one without the bloodlines that ends up being a superstar, but that’s less common.”

Training Your Horse to Turn for a Showmanship Class

Train your horse to turn (or pivot) for a showmanship class with these tips from Howard Cormier, from the LSU Ag Center, provided by eXtension.org.

Getting Showmanship Savvy

By Lindsay Grice - Showmanship is an event in which the handler leads his horse through a prescribed pattern consisting of walking, trotting, backing, and pivots on the haunches of varying degrees. The horse needs to remain attentively by the side of the handler while they perform the pattern together, briskly and smoothly, with no visible signs of cueing from the lead shank.

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