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equine code of practice, code of practice for the care and handling of equines, shelagh niblock equine nutritionist

What does it mean for Canadian horse owners? Are you aware that a Code of Practice for the Care and Handling of Equines (CPCHE) was published in Canada in 2013? Did you know that Equine Canada, the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA), the Canadian Veterinary Medical Association (CVMA), and the Canadian Feed Inspection Agency were among the many partners involved in the development of the CPCHE under the National Farm Animal Care Council (NFACC), and that they remain part of the team that supports the industry-recognized recommendations and requirements established within the Code for good equine husbandry? Let’s look at what exactly this equine Code entails.

Equine Sports Medicine, eqiune vet Steve Chiasson, DVM, CVMA, What Horses Benefit from Sports Medicine high-performance equine athlete horse chiropractic, equine lameness evaluation, regenerative therapy horses aquatic therapy

It’s been a gruelling season but the end is in sight. Looking back, training camp seems so long ago, so many months of hard work, of getting in shape. Last season certainly took its toll on the team. Coaches, trainers, and even the owner commented on the past year’s success and the hard work that went into it.

What is Equine Recurrent Uveitis (eru), UC Davis Center for Equine Health, moon blindness HORSES, IS MY HORSE BLIND? types of horses that go blind, insidious uveitis

Equine recurrent uveitis (ERU), also known as moon blindness, is the most common cause of blindness in horses worldwide. It affects 2 to 25 percent of horses globally, with 56 percent of affected horses eventually becoming blind. More than 60 percent of affected horses are unable to return to previous levels of work. ERU is most often characterized by repeated episodes of inflammation of the uveal tract of the eye (the middle layer), involving one or both eyes. A subclinical manifestation, known as insidious uveitis, does not present as outwardly painful episodes, and instead is consistent low grade inflammation (not episodic) that causes cumulative damage to the eye. Cumulative damage caused by ERU can lead to cataracts, glaucoma, and eventually blindness. Although not all horses that experience a single episode of uveitis will develop ERU, they are at risk for disease.

honey in  horse surgery, colic operation horses, equine colic, horse infection honey, dr kajsa gustafsson large animal medicine and colic, equine science update mark andrews

Abdominal surgery is a major undertaking in horses, and not without significant risks to the patient. Colic operations, especially those that involve opening the gut wall, risk contaminating the wound with bacteria. One of the most common complications after equine abdominal surgery is surgical site infection (SSI) of the abdominal incision.

Night Blindness horses, is my horse blind, equine gene mutations, preventing blindless horse, electroretinography horses, csnb2 horse

Congenital stationary night blindness (CSNB) is the inability to see in low to no-light conditions (essentially dusk to dawn). It is found in horses with two copies of a specific white spotting pattern mutation known as leopard complex spotting (LP), which is characterized by a symmetrical white pattern centered over the rump with few or no spots of pigment in this white patterned area. This coat pattern is common in Appaloosas, Miniature Horses, Knabstruppers, Norikers, and some other breeds.

prevent colic horse, equine colic in winter, is horse getting enough water, national code of practice equines, equine guelph colic risk rater

Nothing can drain the colour from a horse owner’s face quicker than hearing the word COLIC! Winter is an important season to focus on colic prevention and ward off water woes that can lead to impaction in the equine gut.

Early Pregnancy Loss in Horses, Equine miscarriage, Royal Veterinary College (RVC) chromosomal defect horse miscarriages, why did my horse miscarriage

Research from the Royal Veterinary College (RVC) has demonstrated that a chromosomal defect is responsible for a significant proportion of horse pregnancies that fail within the first two months of development. These findings will pave the way for new diagnostic tests for what could be one of the most common causes of pregnancy loss in mares.

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Canadian Quarter Horse Association