Taxonomy term

horse colic, equine colic, colic surgery, western college of veterinary medicine, wcvm

Symptoms, Treatment and Prevention - Most horse owners have their own personal stories to tell about colic — but chances are that everyone’s tales about the dreaded disease are different. Episodes of colic can range from a mild case of abdominal pain that resolves with pain medications to a life-threatening event that requires emergency surgical treatment. With such a variable condition, it can be difficult for horse owners to determine the right course of action for their horse’s situation, says Dr. Carolina Duran, a resident in large animal internal medicine at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM).

Equine Lameness, western college of veterinary medicine, wcvm, horse lameness, game ready, equine ultrasound, equine heel pain

Accurate diagnosis is critical - A lame horse often means a sudden change in plans, and a lameness diagnosis during the summer is an especially disappointing way to end the show season for a horse and its rider. In addition to conventional lameness therapies, newer treatments such as shock wave therapy, cold compression therapy, and regenerative therapies that use the body’s natural ability to heal may help to return horses to the show ring more quickly.

mud fever horses, equine mud fever, supplements for equine mud fever, vetcur, stone hedge farms, Cur1, DiVet, ImVet

This time of year it is a constant battle with the mud and our horses are at risk of getting mud fever. Mud fever is not a single disease but can come in different forms. The condition occurs especially in warm, wet weather, and is certainly not limited to horses that are paddling in knee-deep mud. Mud fever starts off with dry crusts, which are caused by the inflamed skin weeping. The condition can range from a mild skin irritation to very painful infected sores, and can in some cases cause significant swelling with severe lameness.

Equine Pain, horse pain, grimaces score, equineguelph, grimace pain scale

Hiding pain is one of the top survival skills of the horse. An important part of horse ownership is learning to recognize the signs a horse may be in discomfort rather than dismissing certain subtle cues as just bad behaviour. Earlier this year, Dr. Brianne Henderson gave a well-received lecture to a room full of horse owners in Hillsburgh, ON. The attendees were interested in ensuring the welfare of their equine companions by honing their skills for detecting pain.

horse nsaids, equine nsaids, equine tranquilizer, equine sedative, horse tranquilizer, horse sedative, equine deworming, horse deworming

The Dangers of Medicating - In the management of horse health, injuries and disease, conscientious horse owners would never put their horse at risk; however, improper use of some commonly administered equine drugs can impact the health and safety of our horses more than we realize. Seldom does a month go by when media attention doesn’t focus on a positive drug test in the horseracing world. The news leaves many in the horse industry shaking their heads and wondering how trainers or owners could do such a thing to their animals.

headshaking horse, equine headshaking, horse shaking head, headshaking syndrome, percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, pens neuromodulation

All horses will shake their heads to rid themselves of flies, dust, or a minor discomfort. It is a simple reflex action. But when it is persistent, intense, almost dangerous, and the horse is jerking his head up, rubbing, blowing, or constantly shaking as though a fly flew up his nose, it’s time to take a much closer look.

toxic plants, toxic trees, toxic horse, horse toxic, horse poison, equine poison

Fall is here! The leaves are changing and the temperatures are cooling off. It’s hard to imagine that such a pretty time of year could possibly be harmful to our horses. However, fall leaves can pose a potentially deadly threat. The following are trees that are highly toxic to horses.

Pages

Advertisement

Advertisement