Dressage

Does Hyperflexion Cause Stress Horse, Rollkur, Horse in Hyperflexion, cortisol levels horses, equine thermography, equine cortisol release, equine stress, equine superficial body temperature

By Kyla Pawlyshyn - There continues to be much debate about how stressful, if at all, hyperflexion (also called Rollkur), a training practice characterized by exaggerated flexion of the horse’s neck so that, in extreme cases, the horse’s chin touches his chest, is for the horse. The FEI defines hyperflexion as “flexion of the horse’s neck achieved through aggressive force,” and considers the practice to be “unacceptable.”

crooked flying change dressage, straight flying change dressage, flying change dressage, dressage change lead, flying lead change, balance flying change, rhythm flying change, uphill flying change, Sandra Verda

“In a straight horse, the hind hoof steps into or over the track of the front hoof on the same side, whether on a straight line, circle, or curve,” says dressage trainer, coach, and FEI rider Sandra Verda-Zanatta. “The shoulders of the horse should be in line with his hips.

Jaimey Irwin, dressage rider, Tina Busse-Irwin, Stoney Lake Equestrian, Grand Prix dressage, Lindor’s Finest, horse trainer

Growing up in Lakefield, Ontario, Jaimey Irwin always knew he would ride and train horses professionally, settling on dressage as his discipline of choice at age 16. Today, at 35, he has become one of the most successful Grand Prix dressage riders representing Canada on the international stage. The highlight of Jaimey’s riding career to date occurred this past April at the 2013 Reem Acra FEI World Cup Dressage Final in Gothenburg, Sweden. Competing against the best dressage riders from around the world, Jaimey achieved an impressive 16th place finish riding Lindor’s Finest (Lindor), a 16-year-old Dutch Warmblood gelding.

Bonny Bonnello, horse contact, horse riding contact, horse connection, horse riding connection, dressage contact, dressage connection, half-halt trot lengthening, Half-pass exercise, Leg-yield exercise, Half-pass exercise

The importance of contact in dressage cannot be overstated. “Without contact, straightness is not possible, nor is good collection. Your aids, which include your upper body, legs, hands, and seat, combine to create the contact, which should be elastic.

starting out right horse foot, nancy tapley, horse warm-up, Karen brain, horse riding technique, horse training

When we go to the gym we all know that a good warm-up session is essential when it comes to protecting against such injuries as pulled muscles or strained tendons and ligaments. There is no difference when it comes to your horse’s workout. Many horses spend 23 hours of each day standing around in relatively small paddocks.

starting out right horse foot, nancy tapley, horse warm-up, Karen brain, horse riding technique, horse training, Shannon Dueck, horse leg yield, equine leg yield, horse leg yield circle, hunter jumper exercises, Leg-Yielding Out Circle

In the previous article, we covered the general principles of a good warm-up and the reasons why it’s an essential part of every ride. Now we’ll continue to focus on the warm-up with a look at some basic exercises designed to prepare your horse physically and mentally for the workout session.

Lee Tubman, equine rhythm, equine balance, equine relaxation, canter leg-yield, impulsion, Canter Half-Pass, Developing Lateral Suppleness Canter

With Lee Tubman - Lateral suppleness refers to the ability of a horse to bend his body and neck laterally (side to side) while maintaining the same rhythm, balance, and relaxation through his body. In order to achieve lateral suppleness, the strength and flexibility of the horse's lateral muscles must be carefully developed - this is where lateral work comes in.

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