Seasonal Care

Trail Riding tips, Pat Barriage, Trail etiquette rules, Horse Industry Association Alberta, horse trail riding etiquette

Etiquette and safety are closely related, in many cases, a lack of one creates a breach of the other. Poor etiquette typically leads to unsafe situations, while good etiquette paves the trail for a safe riding experience. It is the right and responsibility of every trail user to ensure their own safety and expect safe practices from other trail users.

Managing Spring Mud in Your Horse Pastures

By Horse Industry Association of Alberta - Get out your rubber boots – spring is coming (believe it or not). Unfortunately, so is mud. With the heavy snowfall seen in many parts of Canada this past winter, the spring season promises to be messy when the ground starts thawing and the snow starts melting. Mud can cause problems for horse owners. It affects pastures and can cause health issues in horses.

Horse Management Tips for Cold Temperatures

By Holly Wiemers - Bitter cold temperatures have been a theme this winter, and are now here again. While the ideal time for cold weather preparation is in the fall, there are management tips recommended by experts to help keep your horses healthy now. According to Bob Coleman, extension horse specialist within the University of Kentucky’s Department of Animal and Food Sciences, horse owners should also think about preparing for acute versus chronic cold.

Winter TLC for Horses with Arthritis

By Laurie Cerny - Freezing temperatures and deep snow can be extremely problematic for horses with arthritic and mobility issues. If a horse is mildly arthritic during the summer it could become unsound during the winter - especially with equine seniors. Combine cold temperatures, dampness, and deep snow or mud and a horse's joints can quickly become sore and less flexible.

Winter Horse Care Tips

By Melanie Huggett - Adjustments to your horse care routines will likely be necessary during the winter months, and should be tailored to your climate and the needs of each individual horse. Here are some tips to help keep your horse in health this winter.

Getting a Good Blanket Fit

By Laura Neufeld - Similar to the way the spring sunshine starts the grass and flowers growing, our horse takes his cue from the decreasing daylight hours to start growing a warm winter coat, and starts “hairing up” up even while the weather is still warm. When the fuzzies start to grow, it’s time to consider your horse’s winter care and wardrobe options. Take the time to make sure your horse’s new blanket fits him to a tee, and provides him with the protection he needs.

De-icing water buckets for horses,  assess your horse barn’s structural integrity, dust control in horse barn, mud management for horses, ventilation for horse paddocks and barns, heated horse tack room

De-icing water buckets, hauling water by hand, and pushing heavy wheelbarrows through deep snow are just a few of the things that many Canadian horse owners have to look forward to in the winter months. But we do them willingly to ensure the good health of our horses during a season that, along with its rain, snow, and freezing temperatures, also brings equine health issues such as thrush, mud fever, colic resulting from dehydration, and respiratory illnesses.

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