Seasonal Care

Horse on Cross Country

The last ten to fifteen minutes of every ride should consist of walking on a long or loose rein to allow the horse to relax, stretch his muscles, and, if he is winded from the exercise, catch his breath. This may be all the cool-down the average horse requires in order to physically recover from moderate exercise on a cool to warmish day. But intense workouts can strain muscles, ligaments, and tendons, and when coupled with soaring summer temperatures can cause your horse’s body temperature to skyrocket. An appropriate cool-down in these cases addresses the recovery of the horse’s muscles and other soft tissue structures that have just been in use, as well as bringing his heart rate, breathing rate, and body temperature safely down to their normal statistics.

Horse Pasture

By Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. - If you let your horse out to graze on pasture for only a few hours each day, and provide hay the rest of the time, you've likely noticed how he approaches the grass like a vacuum cleaner, barely lifting his head the entire time he is outside.

Spring Horse Care

By Kentucky Equine Research - Do you ride all winter, no matter how deep the snow gets, or do you hang up your saddle at the first cool breeze in autumn? If the winter season has caused any modifications in your horse’s exercise level or feeding plan, you will need to consider the following points as you bring the horse back into work in the spring.

Spring equine Pasture Precautions, equine pasture turnout, grazing muzzle, equine founder, equine laminitis, equine colic

The brown stubble of winter is being replaced by the first tender shoots of green spring grass, and your horse is eager to hit the pasture and mow down. But early spring grass has high sugar and protein content, and a horse that is unaccustomed to its richness (as most horses are after our long Canadian winters) may be at risk for laminitis and colic if he is abruptly turned out to overindulge on lush pasture.

Trail Riding tips, Pat Barriage, Trail etiquette rules, Horse Industry Association Alberta, horse trail riding etiquette

Etiquette and safety are closely related, in many cases, a lack of one creates a breach of the other. Poor etiquette typically leads to unsafe situations, while good etiquette paves the trail for a safe riding experience. It is the right and responsibility of every trail user to ensure their own safety and expect safe practices from other trail users.

Managing Spring Mud in Your Horse Pastures

By Horse Industry Association of Alberta - Get out your rubber boots – spring is coming (believe it or not). Unfortunately, so is mud. With the heavy snowfall seen in many parts of Canada this past winter, the spring season promises to be messy when the ground starts thawing and the snow starts melting. Mud can cause problems for horse owners. It affects pastures and can cause health issues in horses.

Horse Management Tips for Cold Temperatures

By Holly Wiemers - Bitter cold temperatures have been a theme this winter, and are now here again. While the ideal time for cold weather preparation is in the fall, there are management tips recommended by experts to help keep your horses healthy now. According to Bob Coleman, extension horse specialist within the University of Kentucky’s Department of Animal and Food Sciences, horse owners should also think about preparing for acute versus chronic cold.

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