Seasonal Care

Jackie Bellamy-Zions, equine gut microflora EMS warning, horse care, laminitis, fecal microbial, equine metabolic syndromes, Dr. Scott Weese

Early diagnosis of Equine Metabolic Syndrome (EMS) is an important area of study, especially considering one of the first signs can be laminitis, a serious and sometimes life-ending condition. Catching EMS in its initial stages can facilitate early intervention with an appropriate exercise and diet plan to reduce the chances of laminitis developing.

stomach Bots, equine tapeworms, bot flies, Dr. Wendy Pearson, University of Guelph, larvae pupate, horse care, Seasonal Parasite Control

Your parasite management program should give some attention to stomach bots and tapeworms. To control these parasites more effectively, it helps to understand their life cycles.

Farrier, Farriey, Ben Yager, American Farrier’s Association, equine trimming techniques, hoof-pastern alignment, farrier apprenticeship

Is your farrier certified with the American Farrier’s Association (AFA)? Did he or she serve an extensive apprenticeship at the beginning of their career? Does your farrier pursue additional education?

managing resistant horse parasites, donna foulk, horse parasite control, Small strongyle larvae, horse manure, horse parasites, horse care, Parasite Control Program, horse deworming

Today it is critically important to understand the basics of parasite resistance and develop a deworming program that will work for your farm. That program will need to be reevaluated and modified as environmental conditions change from year to year, and farm management and the number of horses fluctuates.

Imagine being able to help your dog, cat, or horse heal their body naturally. VetCur does just that by providing essential nutrition the body requires to heal itself from the inside out. No chemicals, no genetically modified organisms (GMOs), these are just natural herbs that nature would have provided in the animal’s natural habitat.

help horse survive flies, help horse survive horse flies, help horse survive deer flies, help horse survive black flies, help horse survive face flies, help horse survive house flies, help horse survive mosquitos, paddock pest management, horse flies can cause sweet itch, Barn swallows, bats insect predators, horse care, paddock management

Everyone knows the seasonal annoyance of flies. For horses they can be a real tail swatting, foot stomping, head shaking, skin twitching aggravation. But flying insects such as midges, gnats, horse flies, deer flies, black flies, face flies, house flies, mosquitos, and others are more than a nuisance – they can cause serious skin irritations and can also carry diseases.

overheating horse too hot summer riding heat

A hot humid day. One rider. One horse. Both are exercising at a moderate level. Who is more likely to overheat? It might surprise you to learn that your horse gets hotter much faster than you and is more susceptible to the negative effects of heat stress. Prof. Michael Lindinger, an animal and exercise physiologist at the University of Guelph, explains: “It only takes 17 minutes of moderate intensity exercise in hot, humid weather to raise a horse’s temperature to dangerous levels. That’s three to ten times faster than in humans. Horses feel the heat much worse than we do.”

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Riding Vactions in California with Jec Ballou