Illness & Injury

Insulin Resistance in Horses

By Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. - Do you have an overweight horse? Chances are he is insulin resistant. Excess body fat leads to elevate insulin, and blood glucose levels are slow to return to normal. Elevated insulin leads to more body fat storage, which leads to greater insulin resistance, and the vicious cycle continues.

Stan Walchuk, Jr, equine trail riding first aid, horse rider safety, equine safety, equine first aid, equine tourniquets, equine vital signs, equine wound treatment, Dr. David Reed, horse care

Understanding first aid for horses is a lifelong learning experience born of necessity. Injury and illness are unpleasant realities for horse owners and trail riders, and although seeking the advice of a veterinarian should always be your first choice when dealing with a serious medical condition, if it happens on a trail ride you must be able to respond appropriately until the horse can be seen by a vet.

First Aid for Trail & Home

This article is the second in a two part series about equine first aid for the trail and home. In Part 1 of the series, we focused on vital signs, first response, care of wounds, and home remedies. In this article we’ll be looking at what to do if your horse comes up lame, sustains a head injury, suffers rope burns or saddle rubs, or comes down with the flu while you’re out on the trail.

Equine Herpesvirus-1

By Margaret Evans - In February 2012, Equine Canada’s Health and Welfare Committee advised horse owners on its website that the neurologic form of equine herpesvirus, equine herpesvirus myelitis (EHM), caused by equine herpesvirus-1 (EHV-1) had been confirmed in horses in southern Ontario and California. A blood sample from a horse in Ontario with severe neurological signs tested positive for the virus in early January, 2012.

Biosecurity at horse shows

By Jess Hallas-Kilcoyne - The show season is beginning, which means increased travel and exposure to horses (and possibly diseases) from other regions. Here are some tips to help keep your horse safe and healthy at competitions.

By Kentucky Equine Research - Eastern equine encephalitis (EEE), also known as sleeping sickness, is a viral disease that affects horses, some other animals, and humans. EEE occurs in the Eastern half of North America, most commonly on the Eastern seaboard and the Gulf coast. It is also found in Central and South America and the Caribbean.

Pages

Advertisement

FREE Horse-For-Sale Ads on HORSEJournals.com

Advertisement