Illness & Injury

Sable Island Horses Drug-Resistant Bacteria wcvm research horse dr joe rubin,

Could bacteria resistant to antimicrobial drugs routinely used in both human and veterinary medicine be found in wild horses on a remote island in the Atlantic Ocean? By answering this question, Dr. Joe Rubin and members of his research team at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) hope to gain a better understanding of how bacteria carrying acquired resistance genes are passed between humans, domestic animals, and wildlife species.

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Results from a Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) study have led to a nation-wide change in Equine Canada-sanctioned competition rules regulating the use of the drug firocoxib in performance horses. The national equine sport organization’s rule change regarding firocoxib’s use came into effect on January 1, 2016.

Caudal Heel Syndrome, Trimming horse hooves, Pour-in Pads, vettec, long heels horse, horse landing on toes, overgrown heel horse, equipak cs

Diagnosis and Treatment with Proper Trimming and Pour-in Pads - Proper hoof trimming is vital to the horse’s overall health and quality of life. Hooves that are not trimmed properly become uneven, causing the horse’s weight to be unevenly distributed and the horse to land on its feet differently than when the hooves are properly trimmed. Lameness can result.

Western College of Veterinary Medicine WCVM horse bacteria equine asthma, equine chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), horse heaves

Veterinary researchers at the Western College of Veterinary Medicine (WCVM) in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan are investigating whether certain bacterial populations in a horse’s windpipe can contribute to RAO, or heaves. Motivated by human research on asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), large animal internal medicine specialist Dr. Katharina Lohmann has developed the airway microbiome project.

horse heaves, equine heaves, horse lungs, equine lung disease

Heaves is a chronic, non-infectious lung disease that primarily affects mature horses and can have a significant effect on a horse’s well-being and performance ability. Heaves is also referred to as recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) and is often compared to human asthma. The primary pathologic mechanisms leading to clinical signs in affected horses are bronchospasm, inflammation and thickening of the lower airways (small bronchi), and accumulation of mucus and inflammatory exudates in the airway lumen. The term RAO indicates that the disease is chronic and recurrent, although “remission” from clinical signs can be achieved through treatment and proper management of affected horses.

barbaro rehabilitation, barbaro treatment, equine rehabilitation, horse boken bone, broken leg horse, western college of veterinary medicine, wcvm

Researchers and engineers in Saskatchewan hope a robotic lift system will help to improve the odds for horses recovering from limb fractures and other traumatic injuries. The scientists, who are all from the University of Saskatchewan (U of S), have teamed up with RMD Engineering, a local Saskatoon engineering and manufacturing company, to design and build the unique technology. The lift will help rehabilitate horses suffering from acute injuries and other musculoskeletal problems by providing mobility, weight distribution, and support.

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Researchers at the University of Guelph have made an equine breakthrough that can change the health of newborn foals. Led by John Prescott, pathobiology researcher and former professor, the research team identified an uncommon, but deadly bacterium that causes necrotizing enteritis disease in very young foals, and has already created a vaccine for further research. For years, an unknown strain of this intestinal bacterium has been killing foals within the first week of life. Prescott and his team have worked for several years to understand the cause of necrotizing enteritis in foals and recently identified the bacterial agent and its deadly toxin, which they have called NetF.

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