Feed & Nutrition

equine nutrition, horse nutrition, feeding horses, supplementing horses, horse far, fat to horse diet, equine fat diet

Fats and oils are commonly used in horse feeds to increase the calorie content of the feed or to replace the calories supplied by carbohydrates. Fat supplementation has many benefits including providing calories for weight gain, and providing essential fatty acids to improve skin and coat condition. Feeding fat has also been reported to decrease excitability in nervous horses.

Dr. Tania Cubitt, Key Factors  Feeding Horses Winter, horse down-time, drinking water temperature horses, horse, horse water intake, horse fibre, equine water consumption, chronic equine weight loss,  equine water consumption winter months, equine water consumption pregnant maresn, foal nutrition

Most horses have some “down time” in winter, when adverse weather will not permit much riding or showing activity. A reduction in your horse’s activity level usually means a reduced need for calories, and requirements for grain or concentrate feeding can be lowered. During the winter season, temperatures typically fall below that necessary for pasture grass to grow. Pastures become rapidly depleted of natural forage and horses must increasingly rely on their owners to provide them with a nutritionally adequate diet. To properly feed a horse during the winter months the key factors of water, fibre, and essential nutrients must be addressed.

Recovery, Trevor Watkin, Jason Watkin, glucosamine for horses, purica, equine glucosamine, equine arthritix, equine joint pain

A natural path to healing - The sheer beauty of high performance is that it all looks so deceptively easy. But whether it is a grand prix level horse and rider executing the minutely accurate steps of canter pirouettes, passage, and piaffe in the dressage ring, or ballet dancers executing the complex flows of demi-pointe, frappe, or tendu on stage, both performers know the degree of sacrifice, dedication, pain, and setbacks it may take to get to that flawless peak.

Do Horses need electrolytes in Winter?, horse electrolytes, equine dehydration, equine impactions, Dr. Wendy Pearson

Q: Since it’s cold out and my horse doesn't sweat much when I ride him, should I still give him electrolytes?

equine Chronic Weight Loss, horse Chronic Weight Loss, Poor Quality horse feed, Limited horse Feed, monitoring horse weight loss, horse weight gain strategies, equine Social Interaction, horse Social Interaction, equine weight loss, weight loss in horse, poor quality horse feed, low quality horse feed, equine parasite

Equine weight loss is simply a result of more calories being used by the body than are being consumed. There are several potential causes of chronic weight loss in horses. These causes include poor quality or limited feed supply, health and disease problems, as well as social interaction and competition among horses. Chronic equine weight loss can also be the result of starvation. Equine starvation can be caused by intentional neglect, ignorance, economic hardship of owner, disease, dentition, pecking order, parasites, or seasonal variation in availability of pasture. Remarkably, horses can survive chronic weight loss.

equine obesity, horse obesity, Juliet M. Getty, horse stress, equine stress, equine thyroid, horse thyroid, horse leptin resistant, omega 3s for horses, obese domesticated horses, equine cytokines, equine thyroid medication, horse care, equine cortisol level

Obesity is an epidemic problem with domesticated horses. Although we most easily attribute the problem to overfeeding concentrates combined with too little exercise, the underlying cause is much less apparent. It has to do with the horse’s brain and his response to stress – a chronic low-grade, inflammatory stress.

Juliet Getty, hay analysis, horse hay, eqine omega 3, equine omega 6, equine carbohydrates, equine protein, equine minerals, nutrition horse, hay testing, getty equine nutrition, horse's digestive tract, equine digestion, dr. getty's book

Many horses rely entirely on hay for their forage needs. Is hay nutritious? Not very. Hay is dead grass; it no longer contains many of the vitamins, omega 3s and omega 6s it once had as living pasture. It does, however, contain protein, carbohydrates, and minerals, and is a significant source of energy.

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