Fencing & Pasture

Spring equine Pasture Precautions, equine pasture turnout, grazing muzzle, equine founder, equine laminitis, equine colic

The brown stubble of winter is being replaced by the first tender shoots of green spring grass, and your horse is eager to hit the pasture and mow down. But early spring grass has high sugar and protein content, and a horse that is unaccustomed to its richness (as most horses are after our long Canadian winters) may be at risk for laminitis and colic if he is abruptly turned out to overindulge on lush pasture.

Managing Spring Mud in Your Horse Pastures

By Horse Industry Association of Alberta - Get out your rubber boots – spring is coming (believe it or not). Unfortunately, so is mud. With the heavy snowfall seen in many parts of Canada this past winter, the spring season promises to be messy when the ground starts thawing and the snow starts melting. Mud can cause problems for horse owners. It affects pastures and can cause health issues in horses.

Horse Property Plan,  update horse property, things to consider updating horse property, Jennifer Woodward, purchasing horse property, developing horse property,

Purchasing your dream horse property often comes with unexpected challenges as you move from the imagined luxuries of barn life to the realities of having horses outside your backdoor. This is especially true if, like many people, you end up purchasing a home on acreage without the benefit of a complete horse set up

A Billion Reasons to Manage Your Pastures

By John Byrd, DVM - One high-shedder horse can drop 6+ billion eggs that have the potential to become infective larvae in a pasture over a year’s time. One low-shedder horse can drop 1.5+ billion eggs that have the potential to become infective larvae in a pasture over a year’s time. All other shedders fall somewhere in between. Managing parasites in one horse starts with managing the parasite load of the herd, and managing the parasite load in the herd means managing the pastures.

Testing Your Horse Pasture

By Juliet M. Getty, Ph.D. - For owners of insulin resistant horses, pasture grazing may not be possible. Grass can be too high in sugar and starch. Since horses love to eat a lot of it, very quickly, this grass can significantly raise the level of insulin in the blood. While grass tends to be lower in sugar/starch during the summer, the situation changes as the night time temperatures drop below 40 degrees F, making it especially challenging (and dangerous!) to allow pasture grazing. Many a case of laminitis has occurred during the fall when the nights turn cool.

Deter Wood Chewing in "Eager Beaver" Horses

By Jess Hallas-Kilcoyne - Is your horse destroying your barn, shelters, and fencing with his wood chewing habit? A horse that has taken to gnawing on wooden fences, stall doors, and stable walls can not only cause extensive damage to the facility, the splinters he swallows may put him at risk of colic or other gastrointestinal problems.

Basics of Horse Pasture Management

By Horse Council BC - A well-managed pasture can provide a cheap and reliable source of feed for four to eight months of the year for most horses. Pasture management includes the following basic steps: seeding suitable species; fertilizing with manure and an application of commercial fertilizer; rotating horses out of the pasture before it becomes overgrazed; mowing to prevent weeds; and harrowing to break up manure and expose parasites to the sun.

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Lakeland College - Major in Equine Science - Animal Science Technology Diploma, Vermilion, Alberta.